John L. Hammond (Jack) is professor of sociology at Hunter College and the Graduate Center. He is director of the Hunter College Human Rights Program. He received his B.A. from Harvard College and his M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Chicago. After teaching at Columbia University, he joined the CUNY faculty in 1977. His current research is on the Brazilian Movimento dos Trabalhadores Rurais Sem Terra (Landless Farmworkers’ Movement) and on the use of social science in human rights research and practice.
He is the author of Fighting to Learn: Popular Education and Guerrilla War in El Salvador (Rutgers University Press, 1998); Building Popular Power: Workers’ and Neighborhood Movements in the Portuguese Revolution (Monthly Review Press, 1988); and The Politics of Benevolence: Revival Religion and American Voting Behavior (Ablex Publishing Corp., 1979).
He has received research grants from the National Institute of Mental Health and the National Science Foundation. In 1996 he was a Rockefeller Humanities Fellow at the Institute for the Study of Violence (Núcleo de Estudos da Violência ) at the University of São Paulo. In 2000-01 he was a fellow in Teaching Human Rights Law at the Columbia Law School.
He is a participating editor of Latin American Perspectives and a member of the Editorial Board of NACLA Report on the Americas.
During the 1980s he was active in the movement against US intervention in Central America. He worked as a consultant to the Regional Government of Region I, Nicaragua, and was a volunteer at the Nongovernmental Human Rights Commission of El Salvador. He has also served as an interpreter and expert witness on behalf of political asylum applicants. He is presently chair of the LASA Task Force on Human Rights and Academic Freedom.