Gentrification in Upper Manhattan?

/Gentrification in Upper Manhattan?/

Gentrification in Upper Manhattan?

The third and final report of this Urban Series describes the changes in the traditional Latino neighborhoods of Washington Heights and Inwood.

The Latino community of Washington Heights/Inwood is not being displaced in any meaningful way. While there has certainly been an increase in the number of wealthy non-Hispanic whites over the last decade, as of 2015 Latinos maintained the same proportion of the neighborhood’s total population as they did in 1990. Read the full report here and the press release here.

Gentrification in Upper Manhattan?2019-07-04T14:25:36+00:00

A New Long Island?

The second release for this Spring of the Urban Series is on Long Island. As some of the most traditional New York City suburbs, the Nassau and Suffolk counties have had important changes in the past thirty years.

The report is called “A New Long Island: Demographic, Economic and Social Transformations in New York City’s Historic Suburbs, 1990 – 2016.” The main takeaway? The Long Island suburbs have grown significantly more diverse in the early twenty-first century. Read the full report here and the press release here.

A New Long Island?2019-07-04T14:23:29+00:00

New Urban Series Reports

We are happy to announce the launching of a new initiative at the CLACLS. It’s called the Urban Series. During this Spring semester, we’ll be releasing three reports dealing with the Latino population in New York City and its surrounding areas, focusing on gentrification, inequality, and transitions over time.

The first one studies the changes in the traditional Latino neighborhoods of Jackson Heights and Corona, in Queens.

The findings shown in the graph above may come as a surprise to some. In short, the Latino community of Jackson Heights/Corona is not being displaced in any meaningful way. Want to learn more? Read the full report here and the press release here.

New Urban Series Reports2019-07-04T14:26:23+00:00

The 2018 Mid-Term Elections: Who Voted in Arizona, Florida, Georgia, and Texas?

CLACLS released a new report on the 2018 Mid-Term Election results analyzing voter participation rates by race, ethnicity, and age in four key states: Arizona, Florida, Georgia, and Texas. The report highlights that if Democratic demographic constituencies – African Americans, Latinos, and young voters between 18 and 29 years of age – would have voted at even slightly higher rates, each Democratic candidate would have won by comfortable margins. Read the press release here and the full report here.

The 2018 Mid-Term Elections: Who Voted in Arizona, Florida, Georgia, and Texas?2018-12-04T14:29:39+00:00

Latino Voters in Long Island

CLACLS Director, Laird W. Bergad, was interviewed on Documented about the Latino voters in Long Island. This topic is especially key for today’s Midterm elections. Read the article here.

Latino Voters in Long Island2018-11-06T14:58:59+00:00

Can Beto O’Rourke Defeat Ted Cruz in the November 2018 Texas Senatorial Race?

Read the executive summary here and the full report here.

The newest CLACLS report studies the upcoming senatorial race in Texas. Latinos in that state now are as numerous as non-Hispanic whites in the state. However, while over 62% of non-Hispanic whites voted in the 2016 presidential election, only 40% of eligible Latino voters went to the polls.

Can Beto O’Rourke Defeat Ted Cruz in the November 2018 Texas Senatorial Race?2018-10-15T01:38:13+00:00

New Reports on the Gubernatorial Race in Georgia and the Puerto Rican Vote in Florida

Report: Can Stacy Abrams, a black woman in a former slave state, win the next Georgia gubernatorial election? The answer is yes, but only under particular circumstances which may not be too far-fetched. This new CLACLS report, written by the Executive Director Laird W. Bergad, examines the voter registration rates for the state of Georgia and parses the electorate by race, age, and sex to assess whether Abrams has a realistic chance of winning.

Read the executive summary here and the full report here.

Research Note: Have Puerto Ricans experienced increased voter registration rates in Florida since the November 2016 Presidential Election? Based on the latest data, there has been an increase both in the Puerto Rican population and the Hispanic voter registration rates in Florida since 2016. However, there is no conclusive evidence of a significant rise in voter registration rates among Puerto Ricans in the state.

Read the executive summary here and the full research note here.

New Reports on the Gubernatorial Race in Georgia and the Puerto Rican Vote in Florida2018-10-15T00:21:51+00:00